The Lives of the Most Notorious Highwaymen

By MIRA REINBERG “Why are wicked men such good company?” This question, asked in The Lives of the Most Notorious Highwaymen by Six Elements Theatre playing at Gremlin Theatre, has clearly attracted playwright John Heimbuch, who has offered us a tale that does much more than provide an answer. Early eighteenth-century London is the setting…

Hidebound

by SOPHIE KERMAN Any attempt at writing a play about genocide is immediately plagued by a host of ethical problems. In representing an individual’s testimony on stage, the playwright risks co-opting the voice of the victim or trivializing a traumatic experience in order to gain an emotional response from the audience. And yet taking too…

Beatnik Giselle

by SOPHIE KERMAN You can always rely on the Sandbox Theatre, with its years-long play development process, to present something new, challenging, and seamlessly executed. Beatnik Giselle, performed for just one weekend at the Southern Theater, tackles heavy questions of sexuality and self-expression through a framework of dance, music, and Beat poetry: not a traditional piece of…

2 Sugars, Room for Cream

by MICHAEL J. OPPERMAN The funny I expected, the poignancy I didn’t.  2 Sugars, Room for Cream is a surprisingly moving collection of comic vignettes draped over incidental meetings with coffee, and some harder stuff here and there (“I keep a spare in the trunk” does not refer to a tire). Written and performed by…

Lombardi

by REBECCA HALAT, Guest Reviewer Starting out with a football throwing sequence, History Theatre’s Lombardi got a “pass” for those cheesy moves, as it felt appropriate to have some element of cheese in a play about a football team from Wisconsin. Although there were a few problems with the production, in all this is a truly charming show.…

Meronymy

by SOPHIE KERMAN Memory is a complicated organism, particularly when endless streams of information (both memorable and not) are available at the touch of a button. Rachel Jendrzejewski, more a theater artist than a playwright, may be right in choosing to explore memory through looser forms of movement and linguistic collage, rather than through the stricter structures…

The Cat in the Hat

by MICHAEL J. OPPERMAN The Children’s Theatre productions are so masterful, so pleasurable, so dynamic and so consistently great that it can be easy to take the constant excellence for granted.  Adapted for the stage by Katie Mitchell for Britain’s Royal National Theatre, The Cat in the Hat premieres in the United States here. There…