I Love to Eat: A Love Story with Food

by CHRISTINE SARKES SASSEVILLE Early in the play, I Love to Eat: A Love Story with Food,  James Beard (Garry Geiken) declares to the audience, “Moderation. I’m against it!”  This line captured to me the true essence of James Beard: America’s original foodie, TV’s first cooking show host, confidante of Julia Child and author of over 20 cookbooks.  An award bearing…

Dreamless Land

by SOPHIE KERMAN Dreamless Land is a slippery bit of theater. Characters grow up unexpectedly, the genre shifts from “realism” to dream to science fiction to spy movie, and the viewer is never quite sure whether the actors are playing different sides of the same character or different characters altogether. A glowing cube (designed by Liz…

girl group

It is easy to look back on the 60s and see bright colours, free love, and an exploding music scene. And in thinking of the music of the 60s, it is really easy to name successful female musicians: Carole King is the obvious name, but also lots of groups like The Ronettes, The Shirelles, The…

Nice Fish

by SOPHIE KERMAN There’s a certain mystique out there about fishing, a sense that the long wait (or desperate quest) for a fish can somehow be compared to the various ways of leading one’s life with artistry, impatience, or obsession. The idea has been exploited in various forms for centuries, from “A River Runs Through…

Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde

By guest reviewer YONATAN REINBERG The all-male cast in The Shadow Company’s performance of Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde, by playwright Moisés Kaufman, play a variety of characters from prostitutes to queens, lovers to judges, press to persecutors.  As the clever plot device played by a rascally professor makes clear, however, the…

Stay Tuned

The Yellow Tree Theater needs to perform a delicate balancing act. A well-supported community theater with excellent media outreach, Yellow Tree aspires to put on productions that compel metro area theatergoers to take a trip to Osseo. At the same time, their productions should  please their core audience without lulling them into a stupor, a…

To Kill a Mockingbird

I am always wary when I sit down to see a new production of To Kill a Mockingbird. For one thing, it is so easy for Midwesterners to mess up an Alabaman accent; secondly, child actors in serious roles can, occasionally, be disastrous. Luckily the production at the Park Square Theatre avoided both of these…